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quinta-feira, setembro 17, 2009

Julie & Julia - Julie Powell

Comecei a ler este livro no dia 09/09/09!! E acabei no dia 17/09/2009.




À beira dos trinta, encurralada num desinteressante trabalho como secretária sem fim à vista e num minúsculo apartamento, Julie Powell resolve recuperar a sua vida, perdida num quotidiano monótono, através da culinária. Ao longo de um ano, experimenta cada uma das 524 receitas da lendária Julia Child. Gradualmente passando dos oeufs en cocotte ao bistek sauté au beurre, começa a perceber que aquele Projecto (acompanhado por blog) está a mudar a sua vida. A sua recompensa é não só um recém-adquirido respeito por fígado de porco e mioleira de vaca, mas uma vida inteiramente nova - e vivida com estilo e muito gosto.
Julie & Julia de Julie Powell


Críticas de imprensa
«Um festim, uma viagem, e uma maravilha. Julie Powell escreve sobre culinária da forma como sempre devia ter sido feito: em grandes pedaços de rapsódia, amanteigados, honestos, cobiçosos e besuntados de molho.»
Elizabeth Gilbert, autora de Eat, Pray, Love

«Meditativo, irreverente, e ocasionalmente hilariante… Powell escreve como um Chris Rock da culinária – de forma profana, honesta e extremamente engraçada», Seattle Times «Encantador… Powell nunca pretende ser mais do que quem é: uma rapariga da classe trabalhadora que se atreve a sair da sua vida rotineira para encontrar o que todos nós procuramos, a felicidade.»
USA Today

«Irresistível... Uma espécie de meio caminho entre Bridget Jones e The French Chef.»
Philadelphia Inquirer

«Muito do prazer que retiramos de ler Julie and Julia está na honestidade explícita da autora… Ela mostra os reveses do que é tentar realmente fazer algo de novo com a própria vida.»
Chicago Tribune

A Minha Opinião:
Adorei este livro, adorei a maneira como a Julia Powell escreve. E acho que este livro vai mudar a minha vida, pois vou tentar imitar o que a Julia fez... mas em vez de fazer receitas de um livro com receitas francesas, vou tentar fazer todas as receitas de um outro livro... (de uma coisa que eu gosto mais... e que me dá mais prazer) "A Paixão pelo Chocolate"


Julie Powell (born 1973 in Austin, Texas, USA) is an American author known for the book Julie & Julia: 365 Days, 524 Recipes, 1 Tiny Apartment Kitchen.
Born and raised in Austin, Texas, she attended Amherst College, graduating in 1995 with a double major in theater and creative writing.[1][2]



While working for the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation in August 2002, Powell began the Julie/Julia Project, a Web log chronicling her attempt to cook all the recipes in Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking.[3] The blog quickly gained a large following, and Powell signed a book deal with Little, Brown and Company. The resulting book, Julie and Julia: 365 Days, 524 Recipes, 1 Tiny Apartment Kitchen, was published in 2005.[4] The paperback edition was retitled Julie and Julia: My Year of Cooking Dangerously.
Powell's second book, Cleaving: a Story of Marriage, Meat, and Obsession, which details an affair she had after the first book's publication and which is unmentioned in the film, has had its publication date postponed until December 2009.


Aqui fica o link para o blog do projecto Julie & Julia
http://blogs.salon.com/0001399/

Aqui está o trailer do filme:



Tenho agora que aguardar que este filme chegue às nossas salas de cinema.. estou ansiosa

Informação sobre o filme:

Julie & Julia is a comedy-drama 2009 film written and directed by Nora Ephron. The film depicts events in the life of chef Julia Child in the early years in her culinary career, contrasting her life with Julie Powell, who aspires to cook all 524 recipes from Child's cookbook during a single year.
Ephron's screenplay is adapted from two books: My Life in France, Child's autobiography, written with Alex Prud'homme, and a memoir by Julie Powell. In August 2002, Powell started documenting online her daily experiences cooking each of the 524 recipes in Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking, and she later began reworking that blog, The Julie/Julia Project,[1] into a book, Julie & Julia: 365 Days, 524 Recipes, 1 Tiny Apartment Kitchen (Little, Brown, 2005). The paperback was retitled Julie & Julia: My Year of Cooking Dangerously (Back Bay Books, 2006). Both books adapted by Ephron were written and published in the same time frame of 2004 to 2006. The film is the first major motion picture based on a blog.[2]


Ephron began filming Julie & Julia in March 2008. Meryl Streep portrays Julia Child, and Amy Adams appears as Julie Powell. The film officially premiered on July 30, 2009 at the Ziegfeld Theatre in New York City and opened throughout North America on August 7, 2009.[3]
Julie Powell (Amy Adams) attempts to cook every recipe in Julia Child's cookbook, Mastering the Art of French Cooking. She writes a blog about her experience. Woven into her story is the story of Julia Child's time in Paris, in which she discovers the art of cooking. The film goes back and forth between Julie and Julia's lives.

Cast
•Meryl Streep as Julia Child
•Amy Adams as Julie Powell
•Stanley Tucci as Paul Child, Julia Child's husband
•Chris Messina as Eric Powell, Julie Powell's husband
•Linda Emond as Simone Beck ("Simca"), with whom Julia wrote Mastering the Art of French Cooking
•Jane Lynch as Dorothy McWilliams, Julia Child's sister
•Mary Lynn Rajskub as Sarah, Powell's best friend
•Vanessa Ferlito as Cassie
•Casey Wilson as Regina

Critical reaction

The film has received generally favorable reviews from critics.[9] Rotten Tomatoes reported that 75% of critics gave positive reviews based on 155 reviews with an average score of 6.7/10. Another review aggregator, Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 top reviews from mainstream critics, gave it an average score of 65%, based on 32 reviews. Meryl Streep has been widely praised for her performance as Julia Child. Movie critic A.O. Scott of The New York Times affirmed that "By now this actress [Streep] has exhausted every superlative that exists and to suggest that she has outdone herself is only to say that she’s done it again. Her performance goes beyond physical imitation, though she has the rounded shoulders and the fluting voice down perfectly." Reviewer Peter Travers wrote in Rolling Stone that "Meryl Streep — at her brilliant, beguiling best — is the spice that does the trick for the yummy Julie & Julia." Similarly, Stephanie Zacharek of Salon magazine concluded that "Streep isn't playing Julia Child here, but something both more elusive and more truthful — she's playing our idea of Julia Child."

Los Angeles Times critic Kenneth Turan commented, "[Julie & Julia] does it right. A consummate entertainment that echoes the rhythms and attitudes of classic Hollywood, it's a satisfying throwback to those old-fashioned movie fantasies where impossible dreams do come true. And, in this case, it really happened. Twice."

The A.V. Club gave the film a C, explaining, "Julie & Julia is two movies in one. That’s one more movie than it needs to be.
Entertainment Weekly gave it a B+. The review by Slate was also positive.


Informação sobre Julia Child (August 15, 1912 – August 13, 2004) was an American chef, author and television personality. She introduced French cuisine and cooking techniques to the American mainstream through her many cookbooks and television programs, notably The French Chef which premiered in 1963. Her most well-known cookbook is Mastering the Art of French Cooking, published in 1961.



Child was born Julia Carolyn McWilliams to John and Julia Carolyn ("Caro") McWilliams in Pasadena, California. The eldest of three children, she had a brother, John III, (1914–2002), and a sister Dorothy D. (1917–2006).[1] Child was raised in a well-to-do family where she ate traditional New England food prepared by the family cook. She attended Westridge School, Polytechnic School from fourth grade to ninth grade and then The Branson School in Ross, California, which was at the time a boarding school. At six feet, two inches (1.88 m) tall, Child played tennis, golf, and basketball as a child and continued to play sports while attending Smith College, where she graduated in 1934 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in English[2]. Following her graduation from college, Child moved to New York City, where she worked as a copywriter for the advertising department of upscale home-furnishing firm W. & J. Sloane. Returning to California in 1937, she spent the next four years writing for local publications and working in advertising.
After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Child joined the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) after finding that she was too tall to enlist in the Women's Army Corps (WACs) or in the U.S. Navy through the WAVES.[3]
Beginning her OSS career at its headquarters in Washington, Child worked directly for the head of OSS, General William J. Donovan. Working as a research assistant in the Secret Intelligence division, she typed ten thousand names on white note cards used to keep track of officers. For a year she worked at the OSS Emergency Rescue Equipment Section (ERES) in Washington, D.C. as a file clerk and then as assistant to developers of a shark repellent needed to ensure that sharks would not explode ordnance targeting German U-boats. In 1944 she was posted to Kandy, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), where her responsibilities included "registering, cataloguing and channeling a great volume of highly classified communications" for the OSS's clandestine stations in Asia[4]. She was later posted to China, where she received the Emblem of Meritorious Civilian Service as head of the Registry of the OSS Secretariat.[5]
Following the war she married Paul Cushing Child on September 1, 1946 in Lumberville, Pennsylvania[6], and the couple moved to Washington, D.C. Paul Child, a New Jersey native[7] who had lived in Paris as an artist and poet, was known for his sophisticated palate.[8] He joined the United States Foreign Service and introduced his wife to fine cuisine. In 1948 they moved to Paris after the US State Department assigned Paul there as an exhibits officer with the United States Information Agency. The couple had no children.[5]
Child repeatedly recalled her first meal in Rouen as a culinary revelation; once, she described the meal of oysters, sole meunière and fine wine to The New York Times as "an opening up of the soul and spirit for me." In Paris she attended the famous Le Cordon Bleu cooking school and later studied privately with Max Bugnard and other master chefs. She joined the women's cooking club Cercle des Gourmettes where she met Simone Beck who, with her friend Louisette Bertholle, was writing a French cookbook for Americans. Beck proposed that Child work with them to make it appeal to Americans.
In 1951 Child, Beck and Bertholle began to teach cooking to American women in Child's Paris kitchen, calling their informal school L'Ecole des Trois Gourmandes (The School of the Three Food Lovers). For the next decade, as the Childs moved around Europe and finally to Cambridge, Massachusetts, the three researched and repeatedly tested recipes. Child translated the French into English, making the recipes detailed, interesting, and practical.
The three would-be authors initially signed a contract with publisher Houghton Mifflin, which later rejected the manuscript for being too much like an encyclopedia. Finally, when it was first published in 1961 by Alfred A. Knopf, the 734-page Mastering the Art of French Cooking was a best-seller and received critical acclaim that derived in part from the American interest in French culture in the early 1960s. Lauded for its helpful illustrations, precise attention to detail and for making fine cuisine accessible, the book is still in print and is considered a seminal culinary work. Following this success, Child wrote magazine articles and a regular column for The Boston Globe newspaper.
A 1962 appearance on a book review show on the National Educational Television (NET) station of Boston, WGBH, led to the inception of her television cooking show after viewers enjoyed her demonstration of how to cook an omelette. The French Chef debuted February 11, 1963, on WGBH and was immediately successful. The show ran nationally for ten years and won Peabody and Emmy Awards, including the first Emmy award for an educational program. Though she was not the first television cook, Child was the most widely seen. She attracted the broadest audience with her cheery enthusiasm, distinctively charming warbly voice, and unpatronising and unaffected manner.
In 1972 The French Chef became the first television program to be captioned for the deaf, albeit in the preliminary technology of open captioning.[9]
Child's second book, The French Chef Cookbook, was a collection of the recipes she had demonstrated on the show. It was soon followed in 1971 by Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Volume Two, again in collaboration with Simone Beck, but not with Louisette Bertholle, with whom they had ended their partnership. Child's fourth book, From Julia Child's Kitchen, was illustrated with her husband's photographs and documented the color series of The French Chef, as well as providing an extensive library of kitchen notes compiled by Child during the course of the show.
In 1981 she founded the educational American Institute of Wine and Food in Napa, California, with vintners Robert Mondavi and Richard Graff to "advance the understanding, appreciation and quality of wine and food," a pursuit she had already begun with her books and television appearances.


In the 1970s and 1980s she was the star of numerous television programs, including Julia Child & Company and Dinner at Julia's; at the same time she also produced what she considered her magnum opus, a book and instructional video series collectively entitled The Way To Cook, which was published in 1989.
She starred in four more series in the 1990s that featured guest chefs: Cooking with Master Chefs, In Julia's Kitchen with Master Chefs, Baking With Julia, and Julia Child & Jacques Pépin Cooking at Home. She collaborated with Jacques Pépin many times for television programs and cookbooks. All of Child's books during this time stemmed from the television series of the same names.
Beginning with In Julia's Kitchen with Master Chefs, the Childs' home kitchen in Cambridge was fully transformed into a functional set, with TV-quality lighting, three cameras positioned to catch all angles in the room, a massive center island with a gas stovetop on one side and an electric stovetop on the other, but leaving the rest of the Childs' appliances alone, including "my wall oven with its squeaking door."[10] This kitchen backdrop hosted nearly all of Child's 1990s television series.
Child's last book was the autobiographical My Life in France, published posthumously in 2006 and written with her husband's great nephew, Alex Prud'homme. The book recounts Child's life with her husband, Paul Child, in post-World War II France.
Child was a favorite of audiences from the moment of her television debut on public television in 1963, and she was a familiar part of American culture and the subject of numerous references. In 1966 she was featured on the cover of Time with the heading, "Our Lady of the Ladle." In a 1978 Saturday Night Live sketch, she was affectionately parodied by Dan Aykroyd continuing with a cooking show despite profuse bleeding from a cut to his thumb. It has been told that Julia loved this sketch so much that she would show it to friends at parties.[citation needed] Jean Stapleton portrayed her in a 1989 musical, Bon Appétit!, based on one of her televised cooking lessons. The title derived from her famous TV sign-off: "This is Julia Child. Bon appétit!". She was also the inspiration for the character "Julia Grownup" on the Children's Television Workshop program, The Electric Company (1971–1977), and was portrayed or parodied in many other television and radio programs and skits, including The Cosby Show (1984–1992) by character Heathcliff Huxtable (Bill Cosby) and Garrison Keillor's radio series A Prairie Home Companion by voice actor Tim Russell. Julia Child's TV show is briefly portrayed in the 1986 movie, The Money Pit starring Tom Hanks and Shelley Long; the 1985 Madonna film Desperately Seeking Susan and the 1991 comedy Don't Tell Mom The Babysitter's Dead.
In 2009 Child was half the focus of the feature film Julie & Julia, with Meryl Streep portraying Child; see below for further details.
Child was a favorite of audiences from the moment of her television debut on public television in 1963, and she was a familiar part of American culture and the subject of numerous references. In 1966 she was featured on the cover of Time with the heading, "Our Lady of the Ladle." In a 1978 Saturday Night Live sketch, she was affectionately parodied by Dan Aykroyd continuing with a cooking show despite profuse bleeding from a cut to his thumb. It has been told that Julia loved this sketch so much that she would show it to friends at parties.[citation needed] Jean Stapleton portrayed her in a 1989 musical, Bon Appétit!, based on one of her televised cooking lessons. The title derived from her famous TV sign-off: "This is Julia Child. Bon appétit!". She was also the inspiration for the character "Julia Grownup" on the Children's Television Workshop program, The Electric Company (1971–1977), and was portrayed or parodied in many other television and radio programs and skits, including The Cosby Show (1984–1992) by character Heathcliff Huxtable (Bill Cosby) and Garrison Keillor's radio series A Prairie Home Companion by voice actor Tim Russell. Julia Child's TV show is briefly portrayed in the 1986 movie, The Money Pit starring Tom Hanks and Shelley Long; the 1985 Madonna film Desperately Seeking Susan and the 1991 comedy Don't Tell Mom The Babysitter's Dead.
In 2009 Child was half the focus of the feature film Julie & Julia, with Meryl Streep portraying Child; see below for further details.
On August 18, 2004, a documentary filmed during her lifetime premiered. Produced by WGBH, the one-hour feature, Julia Child! America's Favorite Chef, was aired as the first episode of the 18th season of the PBS series American Masters. The film combined archive footage of Child with current footage from those who influenced and were influenced by her life and work.
In August 2002, Julie Powell started documenting online her daily experiences cooking each of the 524 recipes in Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking. Powell later rewrote the blog, "The Julie/Julia Project," into a memoir, Julie & Julia: 365 Days, 524 Recipes, 1 Tiny Apartment Kitchen (Little, Brown, 2005), the paperback version of which was retitled Julie and Julia: My Year of Cooking Dangerously (Back Bay Books, 2006).
Nora Ephron wrote the screenplay for the film Julie & Julia, which she adapted from Child's memoir My Life in France and from Julie Powell's memoir. The film, directed by Ephron, was released on August 7, 2009 with Meryl Streep playing Child.

Esta é a cozinha da Julia Child que está no Museu:

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